PAST TRAVELING EXHIBITS

ANATLAB TOUCH TABLE

AnatLab was featured at the National Museum of Health and Medicine's exhibit installation and debuted on the Museum's 150th anniversary in May of 2012.  AnatLab is a virtual anatomy laboratory for medical education.  The web-based environment allows users to navigate through human anatomy, using a knowledge base of more than 700,000 annotations covering more than 2,500 different named anatomical structures.  The application derives from data in the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project, which includes images of a male human cadaver that was first frozen then sectioned prior to photographing and scanning each section.  The data was eventually reconstructed using 3D computer imaging software and then used in the AnatLab application.  AnatLab was installed on a multi-touch table that offered visitors a unique interactive experience that contrasted with the natural human specimens installed in nearby exhibit cases.

http://www.medicalmuseum.mil/index.cfm?p=media.news.article.mobile_app_technologies

EINSTEIN BRAIN ATLAS

The Einstein Brain Atlas iPad app was displayed as an exhibit at the National Museum of Health and Medicine (NMHM) as part of an installation titled "What Can We Learn from a Brain?". The temporary exhibit was on display from March 19, 2013 until June 30, 2013. The app was displayed in the NMHM gallery on a 60-inch interactive screen with a multi-touch overlay, allowing visitors to interact with hundreds of life-size, ultra-high resolution slides of Einstein's neuroanatomy via the virtual microscope system.

"This exciting project represents the first time a cloud-based iPad application of this scale has been adapted to stand alone in a museum environment," said Dr. Michael Doyle, Chairman of the National Museum of Health + Medicine Chicago. "We faced significant technical challenges to create a system which provides the same 10 terabytes of Einstein neuroanatomical images that the Einstein Brain Atlas iPad app delivers over the Internet, only in a museum exhibit running an internal virtual cloud. The virtual microscope system that looks cool running on a 10-inch iPad looks amazing running on a 60-inch interactive display in the museum." Also included in the exhibit is the first ever 3D model of Einstein's brain, created using multiple reference photos at different angles. Both the iPad app and the museum adaptation of it are the result of a collaborative research and development agreement between the DoD's national medical museum in Maryland and the NMHM Chicago.

http://www.medicalmuseum.mil/index.cfm?p=media.news.article.never_before_seen_photos_of_albert_einsteins_brain

Permission for use of the photographs of Einstein's brain was given by the National Museum of Health and Medicine.

Superior view of Einstein brain, prior to sectioning. (OHA184.06.001.001.00004.00011). OHA 184: Harvey Collection. Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine. 
Inferior view of Einstein brain, prior to sectioning. (OHA184.06.001.001.00004.00013). OHA 184: Harvey Collection. Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine. 
Right lateral view of Einstein brain, prior to sectioning. (OHA184.06.001.001.00004.00003). OHA 184: Harvey Collection. Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine. 
Left lateral view of Einstein brain, prior to sectioning. (OHA184.06.001.001.00004.00006). OHA 184: Harvey Collection. Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine. 
Anterior view of Einstein brain, prior to sectioning. (OHA184.06.001.001.00002.00001). OHA 184: Harvey Collection. Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine. 
Posterior view of Einstein brain, prior to sectioning. (OHA184.06.001.001.00002.00006). OHA 184: Harvey Collection. Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine.