About

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Mike Doyle is the founder and Chairman of the National Museum of Health + Medicine Chicago. He is also Chairman and CTO of Eolas Technologies Inc., and an active angel investor and co-founder in several Chicago- area tech startups. Dr. Doyle received his PhD from the Department of Cell & Structural Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He went on to serve as Director of the UIC Biomedical Visualization Laboratory from 1989 to 1993. Prior to founding Eolas in 1994, Dr. Doyle served as Director for the Center for Knowledge Management at the University of California, San Francisco. While at UCSF Medical Center, in 1993, Dr. Doyle led a research team that developed the fundamental web technologies which enabled Web browsers for the first time to act as platforms for fully-interactive embedded applications, in the process pioneering revolutionary Web technologies such as streaming media and cloud computing. To assist the University of California in commercializing the related patents, Dr. Doyle founded Eolas, where he is the architect of the company's research and development efforts. Dr. Doyle successfully guided Eolas through major litigation with Microsoft and the development of several key technologies in use throughout the Internet. Dr. Doyle's seminal research in next-generation Web applications, 3-D biomedical visualization, and morpho-spatial genomic activity mapping has led to advances that have been adopted in the x9.95 ANSI National Standard for secure timestamps. Dr. Doyle is an active philanthropist, supporting a variety of charitable causes in the sciences and the arts both personally and through his family foundation, the Buonacorsi Foundation.

Michelle Carr, a Chicago resident and former Goldman Sachs & Co. vice president, recently joined the global Nature Conservancy as the Illinois Director. Key projects include fresh water, urban sustainability, control of aquatic invasive species in Chicago area waterways; wetland, savannah and grassland restoration and management.

Michelle has a long-standing commitment to civic leadership. She currently serves on the board of directors for the National Museum of Health + Medicine Chicago and is a member of the Chicago Foundation for Women and Chicago Finance Exchange. Additionally, she has held various board positions on behalf of Links Hall, a performing arts non-profit.

Michelle holds a Bachelor’s degree from St. Louis University and holds a Master’s degree in business administration from Vanderbilt University. She resides in Chicago with her husband Dane and three children.

 

Maurice Pescitelli is the Course Director for the Medical Gross Anatomy & Embryology course at The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

John Daugherty, MS CMI is the Program Director for the Biomedical Visualization graduate program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is also the owner of Highlight Studios in Mundelein, Illinois and an internationally recognized medical illustrator. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards for his illustration work in medical education and healthcare marketing, including over twenty Association of Medical Illustrators salon awards. His illustrations have been included in exhibitions held by New York Society of Illustrators, National Library of Medicine, Rx Club, John Muir Medical Film Festival, Oakland Museum of Art, William Benton Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, and Lisboa-Terreiro do Paco in Portugal.

 

 

 

Joseph Orgel is an Associate Professor and a British American Scientist based at the Illinois Institute of Technology with appointments in Biology, Physics and Biomedical Engineering. His research interests are concerned with fundamental structural biochemistry problems that have direct links to the understanding and treatment of disease. Using techniques normally applied to small protein crystals, the Orgel group (based at Illinois Institute of Technology) has been able to visualize the molecular organization of connective tissues to a resolution of less than one billionth of a meter. Joseph Orgel leads investigations of brain pathological diseases and connective tissue conditions including heart disease and arthritis, at the National Institutes of Health Biotechnology Research Resource, BioCAT, as Associate Director. He is the Biochemistry Section Editor of the Public Library of Science Journal, PloS ONE and joined the board of directors of NMHM Chicago in December of 2012.

 

 

 

 

FINANCE COMMITTEE

Michelle Carr, a Chicago resident and former Goldman Sachs & Co. vice president, recently joined the global Nature Conservancy as the Illinois Director. Key projects include fresh water, urban sustainability, control of aquatic invasive species in Chicago area waterways; wetland, savannah and grassland restoration and management.

Michelle has a long-standing commitment to civic leadership. She currently serves on the board of directors for the National Museum of Health + Medicine Chicago and is a member of the Chicago Foundation for Women and Chicago Finance Exchange. Additionally, she has held various board positions on behalf of Links Hall, a performing arts non-profit.

Michelle holds a Bachelor’s degree from St. Louis University and holds a Master’s degree in business administration from Vanderbilt University. She resides in Chicago with her husband Dane and three children.

 

Mark Kramer is a Managing Director at Duff and Phelps. He is a member of the integrated healthcare industry vertical within the firm and leads the firm's Transaction Advisory Services practice in the Midwest. Mark has over 24 years of professional experience in Big 4 accounting firms and Duff & Phelps.

Mark received his M.B.A. in management from Lake Forest Graduate School of Management and B.S. in accounting from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is also a certified public accountant (CPA) license in Illinois and is FINRA registered representative (Series 63 and 79). Mark is a member of the American Institute if Certified Public Accountants, the Illinois Society of Certified Public Accountants, and the Association for Corporate Growth.

 

 

Meredith Mack is a Vice President at ARCADIS. She leads their national project management practice for higher education, healthcare and cultural buildings, including projects such as the Lurie Children's Hospital, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Harvard University Art Museums, Cleveland Museum of Art, Saint Louis Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Art.

Ms. Mack was most recently Deputy Director and Chief Operation Officer of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she led teams designing, building, and opening The Modern Wing, as well as leading museum financial and operating departments. Prior to that, she was Associate Vice President of Facilities Services at the University of Chicago, and responsible for all aspects of a $500 million capital initiative and operations and maintenance leadership for buildings and grounds for the campus.

She has a master's degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a BA from Stanford University.

Eva Yam

The National Museum of Health and Medicine, a Department of Defense museum, was established in 1862 and inspires interest in and promotes the understanding of medicine - past, present, and future - with a special emphasis on tri-service American military medicine.

As a National Historic Landmark recognized for its ongoing value to the health of the military and to the nation, the Museum identifies, collects, and preserves important and unique resources to support a broad agenda of innovative exhibits, educational programs, and scientific, historical, and medical research. In its current configuration and new location, the NMHM is poised for broadened attention and use by scholars, scientists and the public at large.

www.medicalmuseum.mil

The Buonacorsi Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit corporation created to support projects in the arts and sciences which promise to provide long-lasting positive impacts on the human condition.

The Foundation was formed in early 2009 with the primary goal of supporting and collaborating with the National Museum of Health and Medicine in various research efforts.

In addition to its support of the Museum, it also supports ongoing research at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, via a multi-year research grant the Foundation has given to the University.

The Foundation also supports the arts through sponsorship of the Beethoven Project Trio, which initially formed in order to perform a world premier in Chicago of previously-undiscovered Beethoven works, on March 1, 2009, and which continues to perform and record around the United States.

www.buonacorsi.org

STAFF

Mike Doyle - Founder and Chair

Dr. Doyle is the founder and Chairman of the National Museum of Health + Medicine Chicago. He is also Chairman and CTO of Eolas Technologies Inc., and an active angel investor and co-founder in several Chicago- area tech startups. Dr. Doyle received his PhD from the Department of Cell & Structural Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He went on to serve as Director of the UIC Biomedical Visualization Laboratory from 1989 to 1993. Prior to founding Eolas in 1994, Dr. Doyle served as Director for the Center for Knowledge Management at the University of California, San Francisco. While at UCSF Medical Center, in 1993, Dr. Doyle led a research team that developed the fundamental web technologies which enabled Web browsers for the first time to act as platforms for fully-interactive embedded applications, in the process pioneering revolutionary Web technologies such as streaming media and cloud computing. To assist the University of California in commercializing the related patents, Dr. Doyle founded Eolas, where he is the architect of the company's research and development efforts. Dr. Doyle successfully guided Eolas through major litigation with Microsoft and the development of several key technologies in use throughout the Internet. Dr. Doyle's seminal research in next-generation Web applications, 3-D biomedical visualization, and morpho-spatial genomic activity mapping has led to advances that have been adopted in the x9.95 ANSI National Standard for secure timestamps. Dr. Doyle is an active philanthropist, supporting a variety of charitable causes in the sciences and the arts both personally and through his family foundation, the Buonacorsi Foundation.


Cyndy Lilagan - Assistant Director

At the museum, Cyndy helps lead a team of dedicated individuals that continue to grow and advance in exhibit development, event planning, administration, and research. Cyndy also plays an important role in developing vital relationships for the museum with community leaders, artists, architects, contractors, consultants, student researchers, volunteers, high school teachers, and university professors.  Cyndy's vast experience in software development and management includes work at Iomas Research and Eolas Technologies as a software engineer/ project and office manager, Third Wave Medical Systems as CTO, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center as a database programmer, and at the University of Illinois at Chicago as an information systems manager. Cyndy has also had the opportunity to teach physics, physical science and chemistry at the high school level. She received her M.S. from the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago and her B.S. from the Department of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University.

 

Erich Theiss - Exhibits/ Technology Specialist

Erich has been with the museum since it's inception. He is an alumnus of the University of Michigan and has a background in history, engineering, information sciences, and nonprofit/political organizations. Similarly, for the museum, Erich has fulfilled many roles, from fixing the toilets to changing the lightbulbs, coordinating events,  providing community outreach, system administration and web design to exhibit curation and design. Currently, his focus is on various tasks for future exhibits, system administration, and occasionally changing the lightbulbs. His recent projects have included the curation of "Medicine on the Front Lines- The Evolution of Battlefield Surgery," based upon the National Museum of Health + Medicines's "Battlefield Surgery 101: from the Civil War to Vietnam," creating templates and automating "Reinventing the Wheel: Stories of Life After Spinal Cord Injury," in collaboration with Backbones, and ongoing work on NMHM AnatLab.

 

Elise Pescitelli - Administration/ Research Specialist

Elise Pescitelli grew up in Gastonia, North Carolina, and migrated to the midwest to attend Beloit College. After her time there, she spent the next five years working on the Visible Human Project via AnatLab for Iomas Technologies. There, she managed a team of pre-nursing students in Texas as they added objects to the Visible Human Male and Female data sets for AnatLab. She also worked as a quality control specialist for AnatLab and added many new objects to the program herself. Since joining the museum in April of 2012, she has worked in a number of different areas and her ongoing responsibilities at the museum are varied. She takes care of day-to-day bookkeeping and accounting, plans and coordinates events, and continues to refine AnatLab. Her strong organizational skills come in handy when help is needed to set up exhibits, arrange spaces for events, organize computer equipment, manage museum supplies, or handle any number of exciting challenges that pop up daily at the museum.

 

Lauren Kalinoski - Exhibits Manager

Lauren Kalinoski is originally from Toledo, Ohio. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Notre Dame and her graduate studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she earned her Master of Science in Biomedical Visualization in May 2014. Her past museum experience includes work with the Toledo Museum of Art as a member of their High School Art Council and their Community Advisory Board. During graduate school she worked at the museum as a Biomedical Visualization Intern, then Fellow. At the museum, Lauren creates visuals (illustrations, graphics, videos) for promotion and exhibits, as well as assists with exhibit design, layout, and general development. Her current skill set is with traditional media, the Adobe Creative Suite, After Effects, 3ds Max, Premiere, and ZBrush. She also has experience using Mimics and Dreamweaver.

 

Heather Robbins - Network Architect 

Heather is our network architect. She strives to create meaningful community partnerships with potential employers and collaborators in healthcare, technology and non-profit sectors for both NMHM Chicago and CodeAbode. Heather earned a Master's degree in Museum and Exhibition Studies at the University of Illinois Chicago in May 2014. She received her undergraduate degree in psychology with a minor in kinesiology. After working as a behavioral neuroscience researcher and lab manager, she began to explore her personal interest in art and art history, as well as her fascination with philosophies of technology and new media. She chose to pursue a degree in museum studies as it offered the opportunity to work in both the arts and sciences. Her past experience includes interning at the International Museum of Surgical Science, UIC's Gallery 400 and NMHM Chicago focusing primarily on exhibition development and grant writing.

THE BUILDING: A CONCEPT

 

Reflections of the Past in a Vision for Tomorrow

National Museum of Health and Medicine Chicago will take advantage of 21st century technology to create a museum experience unlike that of any other museum in the world.

NMHM Chicago represents the synergistic convergence of efforts to advance the state-of-the-art in several areas: education, museum design, information science, community outreach, and architecture. Though sited in Chicago's Loop, this will be a museum "without walls," projecting its influence across the nation and providing a rich immersive information experience to users no matter where they are.

The museum, with the help of the Buonacorsi Foundation, is currently undertaking efforts to raise sufficient funding to complete the creation of the museum and to set it on a course leading to financial self sustainability.

 

The Museum Living as an Organism

With an eye toward a sustainable renovation, NMHM Chicago acquired an existing building in downtown Chicago to house the new museum. Built in 1933, the three-story, 25,000 square foot masonry structure would undergo a dramatic, cutting-edge transformation led by Chicago-based design firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture.

Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture envisions a new kind of museum that is itself a living organism: both in keeping with the museum's theme and content, as well as being a high performance building that will actually generate its own sustainable energy.

As visitors engage with interactive exhibits throughout the museum, they will be able to individually generate energy that will power the building - mirroring the activities of nutrients within the human body. There, developing energy technologies - such as a heel-strike system which harvests force produced by foot traffic - will be visually represented on both interior surfaces and the building envelope, showing visitors the "real-time" display of their energy generation. When the museum is lightly populated it will exude a quiet energy; at peak times it will visibly flicker and pulse from the physical presence of its occupants. The building's facade will also incorporate a new high-tech "wrapper" that projects imagery relating to the museum and its programming. This dynamic exterior will intrigue visitors and engage in an architectural dialogue with the Pritzker Pavilion bandshell to the east on Washington Street.

 

Flexible, Customized, Evolving Learning Experience

The exhibits themselves will take full advantage of the dynamic configurability of the museum's architecture and state of the art systems.

As visitors enter the exhibit space, they can check out headphones with the integrated RFID chips and make a selection from a variety of virtual exhibits. As they move through the space, their presence will be detected and tracked, sending a signal to the display surfaces to configure to the specific content selected by the user. This will allow two visitors walking through the museum just moments apart to see completely different exhibits in the same locations throughout the building.

By utilizing the cutting-edge display technology, evan a small institution can draw from a potentially limitless digital archive of content to provide a total exhibit capacity that can far exceed even the largest conventional museums. This approach can leverage NMHM Chicago's collections in unprecedented ways.

These installations could complement exhibits of other similar objects, or be placed with real-time programming addressing global initiatives to promote the neurosciences.

The museum will also be equipped with a variety of cutting-edge experiential technologies, including spatial audio sound diffusion systems and variable pixel pitch systems to create high, low and zero pixillation imagery at different viewing locations. This will allow the exploration of entirely new ways to present information to visitors.

 

Fluid, Sculptural, and Dynamic Spaces

NMHM Chicago will take advantage of the most advanced technologies to create a museum experience that is completely flexible. Nearly every interior surface of the building will be able to display visual and audio data, allowing visitors to view individually customized exhibit content as they move throughout the building. This dynamic configurability will result in an unprecedented museum experience.

The exhibit and circulation spaces in the building will have a playful, fluid, sculpted, organic character, with walls, floors and ceilings flowing into one another seamlessly. "Plug-and-Play" technology will be integrated into many of these surfaces, allowing display modules to rise from the floor or hang from the ceiling. These modules can display actual artifacts with complex digital overlays and will act as portals into the museum's virtual spaces.

Outside of the primary exhibit space, the building will feature a 300-seat auditorium that will allow still and video images to be projected on its walls, ceiling and floor. A virtual reality chamber will allow visitors and researchers alike to interact with digital versions of biological specimens from the collections. Viewers could see digital representation of brain activity or other organic functions as transmitted by sensors from a living subject.

 

A High-Performance Sustainable Solution

The project will be an example of green retrofits of existing buildings-- a specialty of AS+GG, which is currently involved in a similar undertaking at Chicago's Willis Tower, formerly known as the Sears Tower. When completed, NMHM Chicago will be a state-of-the-art sustainable facility that takes full advantage of cutting-edge systems and strategies for maximum energy performance.

The foundation of NMHM Chicago's green agenda is the adaptive re-use of the original building, a key principle of sustainable construction. The Washington Street façade, which will be visible through the translucent wrapper, will be refreshed by replacing missing portions and extending around to the east side, which is not currently exposed to public view.

AS+GG will also investigate introducing natural daylight through the east and west outer walls of the building to illuminate the interiors, thereby reducing the need for artificial lighting.

Inside, the building's original mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems will be updated to be sustainable and energy efficient. New features - including a green roof, energy-efficient elevators, and high-performance lighting and glazing - will be added to significantly reduce energy use and the building's carbon footprint.

download the architectural brochure! 

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  1. The Building: A History